How to Cook in a Hostel

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Dundee Backpackers in Dundee, Scotland

One of my favorite things about traveling is the food. After picking a destination, and maybe plotting out a few major points of interest, the next thing I do is search for the best restaurants, holes in the wall, and street vendors to visit.

While I love trying local specialties and grabbing meals around a new city, eating out can quickly add up and strain your travel budget. If you’re staying at a hostel, you’ve got the opportunity to cook for yourself and save your hard earned money for other things.

Through my travels, and the various trials and errors they have entailed, I’ve learned a few tricks for making the best of hostel kitchens, no matter how shabby or understocked:

Take Stock of the Kitchen

Before you ever make a grocery list or plan a time to cook, visit the kitchen and see what you’re working with. Check out what appliances, cookware, and tools are at your disposal. I’ve seen everything from well equipped kitchens featuring several ovens and stovetops, to a hostel that only had a single hot plate. While you’re there, see if your hostel provides a “Free Food” cabinet. Many hostel goers buy too much and leave behind their leftovers. This means you can sometimes find a wealth of staples like rice, pasta, oils, vinegars, and spices for free.

Shop With the Locals

Take notice of where the locals shop. Avoid the convenience stores usually found near tourist districts because of their lack of variety and high prices. Instead visit farmers’ markets and local grocery stores to do your shopping. One of the fun things when visiting another country is seeing all the foreign (to you) foods available. Plus if you’re choosing to cook a local specialty, you’ll have no trouble finding all the ingredients.

Avoid Peak Times

Even during off seasons, hostels can be packed with fellow travelers. This means the kitchen area will likely be full during peak eating hours around lunch and dinner. If you can, try and cook a little before or after regular mealtimes. Though cooking side-by-side with other hostel-goers can be a great way to get a conversation going, you might save yourself some time (and stress) by choosing your timing wisely.

Add Some Spice to Your Life

There’s no better way to quickly improve a meal than by adding a hearty dose of spices. Here are a few simple solutions to avoid overloading your backpack with spice bottles while still creating tasty meals:

  • Base your meal choices around the spices available in your hostel’s free pantry. This can lead to some really creative recipe creation.
  • Buy one or two spice blends (cajun, Italian, lemon-pepper, etc.) to just sprinkle on each meal for a serious flavor boost. This works best if you’re traveling for a week or less, so you don’t get tired of the recurring flavors.
  • If you know you’ll always want certain spices on hand, your best bet is to pack your favorites in a stackable pill organizer (like this one.) The screw-on top keeps the spices in place and the containers are usually easy to label.

Keep It Simple

Nobody expects you to make a luxurious five-star meal at your hostel. If that’s your thing, more power to you. But I like to stick with simple “recipes” that require little ingredients. It’s usually a good idea to create a balanced meal with about five ingredients, including a protein source, carbs, and veggies or fruit. Since I’m usually cooking for myself and Peter, and we don’t mind leftovers, most of the meals I cook makes about four servings. If you’re traveling solo, make sure you only buy how much you need for your stay. Some of my favorite simple hostel recipes include:

  • Creamy Lentil Curry: Cook red lentils in coconut milk, vegetable broth, and curry powder. Top with chopped pineapple and cilantro.
  • Shroom Pasta: Cook pasta. Sauté a chopped onion and a few handfuls of mushroom in olive oil. Toss with pasta and sprinkle with red pepper and nutritional yeast.
  • Hearty Soup: In a large pot sauté a chopped onion in olive oil. Add a can of diced tomatoes and a can of white beans. Add a chopped potato or any desired veggies you have on hand. Pour in enough vegetable broth to cover everything and simmer until veggies are tender.
  • Super Spuds: Poke a few holes in a russet potato. Microwave for 5-7 minutes, or until soft. Top with a handful of spinach and chopped green onions. Dollop on salsa and guacamole before serving.

Sugar Free Aquafaba Cappuccino

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The magic of this recipe is that it results in a rich airy drink with no fat or sugar involved. The trick is that aquafaba (cooking liquid for beans) easily turns into a light foam that mimics the texture of finely frothed milk. Combine that with the flavor of vanilla extract and a dash of stevia for natural sweetness, and you’ve got yourself a fine drink to start the morning with.

There’s no need to just stick with vanilla though. I’ve experimented also with lavender and almond extracts, both of which work well in this recipe.

I’ll be the first one to say that I’m by no means a coffee expert, so bear with me using “cappucino” as this recipe title. Does it results in a creamy, sweet, caffeine-filled drink? You betcha. Is it done in a professional manner with a milk frother that will satisfy all the coffee nerds? Not at all. But for those of us without decked-out kitchens you should already have all the required equipment, a stand mixer and microwave, on hand.

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Sugar Free Aquafaba Cappuccino

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

  • 2 double-shots of espresso (or two small cups of strong coffee)
  • 1/4 cup of plain non-dairy milk
  • 1/4 cup aquafaba (if using canned be sure to purchase unsalted)
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon powdered stevia (or two packs of stevia)
  • Cinnamon, optional

Directions:

  1. In a stand mixer, beat the aquafaba on high until it becomes white and stiff, about 8-12 minutes.
  2. Add in the vanilla extract and stevia, beating until well combined.
  3. In a small bowl, microwave the non-dairy milk for 30 seconds.
  4. In two small mugs combine the espresso or strong coffee with the warmed milk.
  5. Spoon the aquafaba topping over, sprinkle with cinnamon if desired.

Nutrition per serving:

Calories: 24 Fat: 1g Saturated Fat: 0g Protein: 1g Carbohydrates: 1g Sugars: 0g

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A Vegan’s Guide to Reykjavik

At the beginning of this month, we spent a wonderful week in Reykjavik Iceland. A vacation we’ve always been interested in taking, the off-season prices combined with an easy direct flight from Baltimore made December the perfect time to visit.

We arrived, bleary-eyed and jet lagged, at 5 a.m. local time. After a much-needed nap at our hostel, we hit the town in the afternoon. Reykjavik is an interesting city. Interspersed amongst the adorable brightly painted houses (that you see in all of the travel books and brochures) is a little bit of a run-down, dirty feeling. Abandoned lots, graffiti, and crumbling buildings were not an uncommon sight. Not to say we didn’t like the city, our love for New Orleans should show a little grime doesn’t bother us, but Reykjavik was just a bit rougher around the edges than we expected. It’s a case of remembering everything is not always as it appears in Instagram. dscn1797Throwing aside all expectations, Reykjavik was a beautifully unique city. You could be walking along a regular street, glance up, and realize that there are magnificent mountains just waiting to be gazed at. dscn1876Amongst the (undoubtedly) illegal graffiti, were dozens and dozens of murals. It seemed like every neighborhood or section of the city had their own art thrown onto shops, houses, and government buildings.

There are also hidden treasures in the city like Thufa hill, which offers amazing views of Reykjavik and is quite an adventure to get to, or the hot spring where the birds hang out next to the Sculpture and Shore Walk.dscn1904dscn1915dscn1884And outside of Reykjavik, thanks to day tours like the Game of Thrones Tour and the Silfra Snorkeling adventure, you can see the amazing beauty of Iceland’s landscape. Whether it’s by tour bus or rental car, everyone should take at least a day to get out in the wide open countryside.

dscn1966dscn1954img_114915384346_10210144167034436_1812502638669731878_oBut now to get onto what every vegan likes to research before a big trip: Where to eat.

I will warn you guys, the food photography is not great here because wintertime Iceland has sunlight for only about six hours. Combine that with low-light restaurants, and you’ve got some less-than-stellar photo ops. But I promise everything I pictured was delicious and beautiful when I was served.

Iceland was apparently the land of defying expectations. Meaning: every blog, book, or website I read said Iceland was one of the hardest places to eat vegan. I’m happy to say there was no shortage of yummy and satisfying vegan food, which was not hard to find at all. Honestly, Reykjavik was much more vegan-friendly than any place in the Southern U.S.

My only warning is that dining out in Iceland is expensive. A cheap meal for two people is about $20, and that’s if you’re getting something like chips (fries) and a soda. Since a lot of foods (especially fresh produce) have to be imported, it makes sense. But be aware that the majority of your vacation budget can easily be blown on a night out of fine dining. Because of this, Peter and I stuck to more casual eateries, though according to Happy Cow there are many more choices available in the city for those willing to drop some cash.

Here are some of the amazing places we dined at:

Kaffi Vinyl

Totally vegan and with a wealth of menu options, Kaffi Vinyl was our first stop for food. The restaurant, which also doubles as a record shop and music venue, had a relaxed vibe with servers changing the records as they ran out. We both got coffees, Peter’s was cold and mine was hot, in an attempt to help our adjust to the time change. They offered several non-dairy milk options like soy, oat, and coconut.dscn1799Peter ordered the lasagna, which was an extremely hearty meal filled with rich marinara, veggies, and a sprinkling of vegan parmesan atop. It was served with rustic bread, olive tapenade, and salad.

I took a chance on a bizarre sounding combo, and ordered the black bean burger, which came with blueberry jam, kimchi sauce, some type of cream cheese, pickled veggies, and a slice of pineapple. I just have to say, this burger was so good. I never would have thought to put a sweet jam on a burger (I guess I didn’t learn from that episode of Spongebob) but the whole thing just worked. Sweet, salty, creamy, tangy, every bite had a big burst of flavors.

Cultural note though, Icelanders tend to avoid eating with their hands. For example, I was given a fork and knife to eat this burger and watched two locals at another table cut theirs apart too. So just keep that in mind when you get a “hands on” food.

Reykjavik Chips

A restaurant entirely dedicated to potatoes is my kind of place. Serving only (you guessed it) chips, Reykjavik Chips is a cute little shop that you shouldn’t miss out on. Their large pile of potatoes next to the cash register (see below) should attest to how popular it is.

The chips come in two sizes, small and large, and I highly recommend getting a small. Because when they say large, they mean it. The container is roughly the size to hold two American large fries, so stick with a small (which is about the size of one American large fry) unless you’re sharing.

The crispy on the outside, but soft on the inside, chips are made fresh-to-order and topped with whatever sauce you desire. Vegans have the options of ketchup or rich peanut-y satay sauce. Best part? Since Icelanders don’t eat with their hands, when they toss the chips in a sauce it’s served with a skewer to eat with.

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Nudluskalin

Just what you need when the cold wind is whistling into your face, Nudluskalin is the place to go for a meal that will warm up your frozen body.

Very easy to eat vegan at, you can substitute tofu for any meat and several of their menu items are already vegan. I choose the Green Throughout (below, right), a rice noodle soup that is heavy on the veggies and features fresh garlic and chilis for a thorough sinus cleansing.

Peter got the vegetarian option of Bamm Al Pomodoro, a less-brothy hybrid dish that had a bit of Asian and Italian influences. With a tomato broth base, it featured fresh egg noodles, peppers, carrots, Italian herbs, and a hearty handful of beansprouts atop. dscn1951

Joylato

Joylato is one of those places you’d never expect to have vegan options, and I’m pleasantly surprised every time I turn out to be incorrect. Using liquid nitrogen, you can mix-and-match ingredients for you own custom bowl of ice cream.

You have the options of the base being coconut or dairy milk, then choose the flavor of ice cream you want, add in sweet bits like fresh fruit or chocolate bits, and finally decide if you desire a sauce to drizzle atop. Besides the dairy milk, the only non-vegan add-in was white chocolate chips. I went with a coconut-based salted caramel ice cream with chocolate fudge sauce.

Despite the oxymoron of eating ice cream in cold weather, it was a great sweet treat. But if you’re wanting something a bit warmer, they also make vegan hot chocolate or chai tea that is perfect for sipping while exploring the city.

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Pylsa/Pulsa

Icelanders seem to love their sausages and hot dogs. I was thrilled to be able to try a vegan version of the local favorite at Pylsa/Pulsa, which was only made better by the fact that it was in the same building as our hostel.

We both got the Bulsur Sausage, which was labeled as “100% vegan” and sat at the bar to eat. If you’re interested in local Icelandic brews too, they had several options on tap. The sausages were crisp on the outside and slightly soft on the inside, with a heavily spiced flavor that was balanced out by the herb gravy. On the side was mashed sweet potatoes and a green salad. img_1122

Glo

Right off the main street of Reykjavik, Glo is the best place to stop for a healthy afternoon meal. With about half a dozen mostly-vegan salad options, along with wraps and soups, you can mix-and-match until you’ve got the perfect plate.

I ordered some ridiculously creamy cauliflower soup, which came with a dense (in a good way) piece of wheat bread, and three salad of my choice, which were cabbage, potato, and quinoa. Peter got a slightly spicy hummus wrap and the same salads too. Each of left feeling totally full, but not weighed down at all, by the veggie-packed meals.

Habibi

Although they’re usually a safe bet for vegans, the falafels at Habibi weren’t just your average meal. I ordered the falafel wrap, asking for no dairy sauces, and the lovely guy behind the counter quickly began frying them up. The soft wrap was just the right balance of crunchy falafel, mild veggies, and silky hummus, and definitely beat out anything falafels I’d eaten before. If we’d had more time in the city, I definitely would have returned to try their falafel plate too.

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The Deli

Due to construction, the entrance to The Deli isn’t the easiest to find, so just look out for the spray painted pictures of pizza. Peter, a severe pizza fiend, was hankering for some when we found The Deli.

He got several of their vegetarian slices, like margherita and white garlic, which were displayed behind the counter. I was a bit more difficult, and ordered the pasta alla noplentana, without cheese or garlic bread, and was pleased that the staff didn’t seemed puzzled at all by my dairy-free request.

The pasta and pizza, which we got to-go, were both great. Peter was a happy camper, and I was pleased by the pasta tossed in a rich marinara sauce and dotted with fresh cherry tomatoes, basil, and black olives. Their drink selection was vast too, so keep an eye out for Icelandic brands. I got an interesting bitterlemon soda that was a delightful balance of bitter, sour, and sweet.

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1011

It may seem strange for me to include a convenience store at the end of this list, but it’s here for a good reason. 1011, which has branches throughout the city, boasts a large section of pre-made foods. A shocking amount of these dishes are vegan, and clearly labeled so.

Vegan sandwiches, salads, falafel meals, rice bowls, curries, and daals, are available in the refrigerated section for very decent prices. Peter and I shopped their several times for meals to take on long day tours and everything we tried was fantastic. This wasn’t run-of-the-mill gas station grub either, everything was properly prepared and about as good as the food we ate at the nearby eateries.

dscn2001dscn1997dscn1999As a bonus, keep an eye out at 1011 for the “Cool American Doritos”. They’re not vegan, just very funny. dscn1944

Eating Through The Land of Ooo – Macaroni Salad

One of my favorite television shows, Adventure Time is a wacky ride of funny characters, sometimes heart-wrenching storyline, and food. Lots of food. It’s hard to go through an episode without watching a character make a sandwich, share some spaghetti, or feed their loved one a bowl of soup.

I love basing recipes off of shows, books, and movies, so this is the first installment of my series “Eating Through The Land of Ooo” which is where Adventure Time is based. I’m hoping to eat my way through the majority of episodes, drawing inspiration from the characters’ various meals.

Our first meal takes place in “Ocarina”season 6, episode 12. Jake the dog is celebrating his pups’ birthdays, but they’re all disappointed when arrives with no presents and a small amount of macaroni salad.

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                  Photo: Adventure Time Wiki

Although the pups were disappointed with Jake’s beige take on this carb-centric dish, I’m sure they would have been thrilled with this recipe. I pepped it up a bit by adding heavy-hitters when it comes to flavor like salty olives, sweet roasted red peppers, and tangy pickles. The dressing, although vegan-mayo based, isn’t too heavy and allows the whole dish to be cohesive instead of a gloopy mess.

Although it’s tempting to eat it straight out of the mixing bowl, this recipe really shines when you let it fully sit overnight. Everything melds together to create a dish that you’d be proud to bring to your next birthday party.macaroni salad.jpg

Birthday Macaroni Salad

Serves: 10

Ingredients:

  • 1 lbs. macaroni pasta
  • 1 15.5 oz. can black olives, drained and sliced
  • 1/2 cup chopped roasted red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped dill pickles
  • 1/3 cup sliced green onions (both white and green parts)
  • 1/2 cup vegan mayonnaise (such as Vegenaise)
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon dijon mustard
  • 1/2 tablespoon agave nectar
  • 1 teaspoon dried dill
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste

Directions:

  1. Cook macaroni according to package’s directions.
  2. Once cooked, drain the pasta and rinse with cold water until cool.
  3. Combine in a large bowl with the remaining ingredients. Mix well.
  4. Set in the fridge to chill and for flavors to meld for at least 3 hours, preferably overnight.  

I’m Baaaaaack

And feeling good.

So this blog has been static for almost an entire year. When Gallivanting Vegan went silent, Peter and I had just moved to a new apartment (that we’re still in and enjoy, yay!), and I’d just been hired by MyRecipes, which left the blog as a non-priority in my newly jam-packed life. Since then, we’ve done some traveling, changed up jobs, and added a new (four-legged) member to our family, Momo the cat.

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I’m now working for Cooking Light, which is a sister brand of MyRecipes, so I didn’t even have to move desks (or leave my awesome co-workers) when I switched positions. Through these jobs, which involve my two loves of food and words, I’ve have the opportunity to do/write some awesome things, like:

So, inspired a lot by the work I do, I’m hoping to post more consistently now. With everything from recipes to vegan travel guides to how-tos. This entire absence I’ve still been making and noshing on delicious vegan food, so I’ve got a nice little backlog of content ready for you guys. Keep an eye out in the next few days for new posts. To easily keep up to date, follow the blog on Facebook by clicking the like button on the side bar.

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Visiting I Dream of Weenie in Nashville.

New York City – Pt. II

During our second day in NYC in December, we meandered over to the Chelsea Market for a killer early lunch. DSCF0423There’s a nearly overwhelming amount of food and shopping options there, even when you’re “limited” to a vegan diet. We took a good 45 minutes to wander through everything before making food choices.DSCF0432I chose to get ramen from Mok Bar, which touts itself as a Korean ramen noodle bar. DSCF0435I got the one vegan option available, which was miso doengjanjjigae, which is based on the flavors of a popular Korean stew. It had great chewy noodles in a umami-packed broth with triangular tofu, fried onions, seaweed, and other choice veggies.

I also have a weakness for fermented foods, so I got the kimchi trio sampler and chose the traditional, daikon, and green onion types. Everything was amazing, even the daikon kimchi which I was a bit iffy about at first. In the end, although I’m sure this will reveal to readers how little couth I really possess, I added all three types of kimchi to the ramen to make a salty spicy bowl of awesome.DSCF0446I also had a little trouble breaking apart my chopsticks.DSCF0440Peter partook in Takumi Taco, which specializes in Japanese inspired Mexican food. He got an infant-sized burrito that included Japanese lentils, brown rice, beans (pinto, black, and edamame), ginger pico, cabbage slaw, and avocado cream. He said it was like eating a huge sushi roll with tasty Mexican food filling and gave it a thumbs up.DSCF0439Cyanide & Happiness fans will be happy to know there’s an original drawing hanging in the Market.DSCF0454A lot of the shops were selling bizarre and adorably creepy items. If only I’d had more room in my backpack. DSCF0452Despite it being cold outside, we ordered some gelato and sorbet for the road from L’Arte Del Gelato. I was pleasantly surprised when the guy behind the counter said all the sorbet flavors were vegan, even the dark chocolate! That combined with a scoop of coconut sorbet was like eating a cold Mounds bar. Peter stuck with an old favorite and got chocolate chip mint gelato.DSCF0448While waiting for a subway to Brooklyn, I noticed the most adorable art installation, Life Underground. Thankfully our ride took a while, so I had plenty of time to wander around and take pictures of the small sculptures made by Tom Otterness. Below are just a handful of the ones I took.

For those of you unaware of the Sketchbook Project, please go check out their website. It’s a really neat project where you purchase one of their sketchbooks and decorate it and fill the pages however you’d like. When you’re done, you send it back in and they add it into their collection in the Brooklyn Art Library.DSCF0482Peter and I participated in the Project a few years ago and were excited when we learned you can visit the entire collection. They have a nifty “check out” system where you can pick out books by theme or name, then you also get the two books next to it as a random bonus. DSCF0481We spent the next hour or so enjoying browsing through sketchbooks that ranged from amazing (like the watercolor travel journal about a visit to Singapore) to the just plain weird (I’m looking at you, book with only lipstick kisses inside). DSCF0480Brooklyn was definitely the most artsy part of New York that we saw. There was a good amount of street art to gawk at as we marched under the elevated subways and avoided the seedier looking areas.DSCF0497DSCF0485DSCF0492DSCF0498DSCF0500DSCF0487We ended our day by visiting someplace I’ve wanted to go to since I heard of its opening, Dr. Cow, a vegan “cheese” shop. The adorable shop front is so tiny it would be easy to just walk past it, but trust me, vegans, you don’t want to miss this.DSCF0490Inside is a small case displaying their various cheesy wares. The options ranged from the simple like plain cashew or sea salt, to the more bizarre like black salt with beet or balsamic with turmeric.

Thankfully, you can sample any of the flavors, so don’t worry about taking a blind guess at what tastes good. We settled in the middle of the strangeness spectrum and purchased some smoky celery salt cashew cheese.

This stuff was rich, creamy, packed with flavor, and everything I’ve ever wanted from “fancy” vegan cheese. I can’t promise if I lived in Brooklyn I wouldn’t be that person bringing out a fruit and cheese plate when company comes over.DSCF0488A short walk away is Dun-Well Doughnuts, an entirely vegan paradise of fried dough. There was a huge assortment of flavors and it was hard to choose. The guy behind the bar was helpful in giving suggestions on what to order. We ended up getting a mix of chocolate, maple, and eggnog doughnuts to take back to the hostel with us.DSCF0504And that’s how our two days in NYC ended. With us sitting on our hostel bunk beds happily eating cashew cheese and doughnuts for dinner. DSCF0502

New York City Pt. I

I was planning on posting about our vacation much sooner, but I was busy on the hunt for a job after graduating. I’m happy to say that I’ve found one, and in the food writing industry no less! I’ll be MyRecipes.com’s recipe editor and officially start in two weeks. On top of that Peter and I will be moving soon, so there’s a lot of exciting change happening in our household!

Back to our December vacation though:

It was a challenge to find someplace reasonably priced (and not 100% sketchy) in New York City, but we finally settled for the Harlem YMCA. Our room was a pristinely clean private bunk bed with very nice bathrooms, a simple kitchen with a fridge and microwave, and it was just one block from the subway.

A plus was the good view of Harlem!DSCF0376We arrived to the city ridiculously early at the crack of dawn and decided that we would skip the subway and walk the still peaceful streets to Central Park. DSCF0317DSCF0319We arrived at the park and spent the next hour wandering around and dodging early morning runners and cyclists. DSCF0329DSCF0327DSCF0325DSCF0335DSCF0331DSCF0333To avoid a hangry meltdown from us both after walking several miles with no food, we ate breakfast. We found a small, unmarked food truck (we’re still not sure it was legal) that was whipping out sandwiches. Peter got an egg and cheese and I got a PB&J on a plain bagel. Both sandwiches were toasted on the griddle and delightfully warm after being in the cold wind for a while.

Ready to give our feet a rest, we jumped on the subway and headed to The New York Public Library.DSCF0345DSCF0347The architecture was everything we hoped for and we spent half the time with heads craned back and mouths open. Sadly, the reading room, which is one of the main attractions for visitors of the library, was closed for ceiling restoration. We’ll just have to add it to our “see it next time” list!DSCF0352The kid’s room had a rad lego version of the lions on the front steps.DSCF0359Our next stop was the Morgan Library and Museum. While the picture below is of the original building owned by J.P. Morgan, the actual museum now spans through several buildings with various exhibits and galleries. DSCF0370The sheer amount of ornamentation was astounding and down to the most minute parts of the building were embellished. DSCF0364The most stunning part, hands down, was the library. All I could think was “This is my dream!” as we saw the thousands of books.DSCF0369They also had several Medieval manuscripts on display that Peter promptly had a freak out over.DSCF0367Lunch was at Franchia, a vegan Korean restaurant. We were both really excited to try Korean because despite being voracious eaters of kimchi at home we’d never eaten anything close to the traditional cuisine. Although both of us ended up getting dishes that had names from other countries in it, so it may not have been as traditional as we intended.

I got the Penang Noodles with Spicy Curry and Coconut Broth. I have a weakness for any type of Asian noodles, so this was right up my alley. Not very spicy, but it was a flavorful creamy broth full of vegetables, chunks of tofu and mock chicken, and delightfully chewy noodles.DSCF0374Peter also took the pasta route and chose the Singapore Curry Angel Hair. It was a good size plate of noodles in a thin curry sauce tossed with vegetables and served with lobster balls. The latter was new to us, and it tasted like a soft seafood-y meatball. It was a great meal and the service was extremely good with very friendly waiters.DSCF0373After our lunch we were fairly tired from all we’d packed into the morning, so we went back to the YMCA for a small power nap to regain some energy.

Feeling fresh and ready to go, we went to the most obnoxious of all American landmarks: Time Square. Despite the overwhelming amount of ads and flashing lights, we had a good time people watching and doing what we do best. Eating.

We got snacks and some hot drinks for our frozen bodies from Nuchas, which was a tiny food truck in the thick of things. DSCF0381I got an almond milk cappuccino and shiitake curry empanada. They both were great and we had a great time laughing at all the insane people in costumes in the square.DSCF0384Our personal favorite was the guy who had a giant pot leaf shirt and was carrying around US and UN flags while screaming “LEGALIZE IT!” He wasn’t even asking for money. Just spreading the word, apparently.DSCF0390Our main entertainment for the night was Matilda the Musical at the Shubert Theatre. DSCF0395I have to start by saying this was my first Broadway show ever. So I may just be not be used to something of this quality, but Matilda the Musical was the best live performance I’ve ever seen. The cast was amazing, the story was equally funny and melancholy, and the props were so good that when Peter and I left we were still trying to figure out how they did a few of the scenes.

Seriously, if you like Matilda the book or the movie, or you’re just wanting to see a good musical while in NYC, please think about this one.DSCF0405Pizza was something we felt like we had to do in New York. So we chose Pizza Suprema for dinner because of the combination of it being voted best slice in town and they had vegan pizza available!DSCF0419Right after I took this photo the place got ridiculously packed to where people were sharing booths with one another. A good sign when you’re someplace with as many pizza options as NYC.DSCF0416Peter got cheese and I got the vegan. The vegan was chock full mushrooms, tomatoes, bell peppers, onions, and herbs. It was so juicy and good, it didn’t even need vegan cheese or anything. Peter didn’t even have words for his, he just kept going “Mmmmm” with his mouth full. It definitely lived up to our expectations.DSCF0412Overall a jam-packed first day in NYC and much more fun to come!